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Updated: 23 hours 2 min ago

The case for open sourcing the SQL Saturday Website

Wed, 2014-04-09 23:04

My name is Justin Dearing. I write software for a living. I also write software for free as hobby and for personal development. When I’m not writing code, I speak at user groups, events and conferences about code and code related topics. Once such event is SQL Saturday. I haven’t spoken in a while because I became a dad in June. However, my daughter is 9 months old now and the weather is warm. I feel comfortable attending a regional SQL Saturday or two.

So last night I submitted to SQL Saturday Philadelphia. The submission process (I mean the mechanical process of using the website to submit my abstract) was annoying, as usual. What really got me going though was when I realized two things:

  • My newlines were not being preserved so that my asterisks that were supposed to punctuate bullet points were not at the beginnings of lines.
  • I could not edit my submission once submitted.

I like bullet points, a lot. However, I digress. In response to my anger, I complained on twitter that the site should be open sourced, so I the end user could create a better experience for myself and my fellow SQL Saturday Speakers.

Dear @sqlpass throw the sql saturday website source code on github, and I'll send yo pull requests.

— Justin Dearing (@zippy1981) April 9, 2014

I got three retweets. At least I wasn’t completely alone in my sentiment. I complained again in the morning, started a conversation and eventually Tim sent this out this:

@TampaDBA We have no plans to open-source the SQL Saturday website redesign that is already underway. cc @zippy1981 @SQLRockstar @sql_r

— Tim Ford (@sqlagentman) April 9, 2014

So the site was being rewritten, but it would not be open sourced.

Should I have been happy at that point, or at least patiently await the changes? One could presume that session editing and submission would be improved. At the very least, things would get progressively better as there were revisions to the code. If the federal government could pull off the ObamaCare site, with some hiccups, why can’t a group of DBAs launch a much smaller website, with much simpler requirements and lower load?

I’d be willing to bet they will. I’d be willing to bet that this site will suck a lot less than the old site, and that it will continue to progress. I’m sure smart people are working on it, and a passionate BoD are guiding the process. At the very least I’ll withhold judgement until the new site is live.

Despite my confidence in the skills of the unknown (to me) parties working on the site, there are so many hours in the day and only so many things a team of finite size can do. However, a sizable minority of PASS’s membership are .NET developers. Many of them speak at SQL Saturdays. They have to submit to the site. Some of them will no doubt be annoyed at some aspect of the site. Some of them might fix that annoyance, or scratch their itch in OSS parlance, if the site was open source and there was a process to accept pull requests.

I’m not describing a hypothetical nirvana. I’ve seen the process I describe work because I’m submitted a lot of patches to a lot of OSS projects. I’ve submitted a patch to the (not actually open source, as Brent will be the first to state) sp_blitz and Brent accepted it. I’ve contributed to NancyFX. I once contributed a small patch to PHP to make it consume WCF services better. I’ve contributed to several other OSS projects as well.

Perhaps your saying SQL Server is a Microsoft product, not some hippie Linux thing. Perhaps you share the same sentiment as Noel McKinney:

@zippy1981 @sqlagentman @TampaDBA @SQLRockstar @sql_r Open sourcing the site would be inconsistent with the mothership's beliefs

— Noel McKinney (@NoelMcKinney) April 9, 2014

However, as I pointed out to Noel, the mothership’s (i.e, Microsoft’s Editors Note: Noel has stated to me he meant Microsoft) beliefs are not anti OSS. Microsoft has fully embraced Open Source. You can become an MVP purely for OSS without any speaking or forum contributions. One of the authors of NancyFX is an example of such a recipient. F#, ASP.NET and Entity Framework are all open source. Just this week Microsoft Open Sourced Roslyn. As a matter of fact I’ve even submitted a patch to the nuget gallery website, which is operated by Microsoft and owned by the OuterCurve foundation. The patch was accepted and my code, along with the code of others was pushed to nuget.org. So I’ve already submitted source code for a website owned and operated by an independent organization  setup by Microsoft, they’ve already accepted it, and the world seems a slightly better place as a result.

So I ask the PASS BoD to consider releasing the SQL Saturday Website source code on github, and I ask the members of PASS to ask their BoD to release the source code as well.

Categories: Planet

Creating a minimally viable CentOS OpenLogic rapache instance

Sun, 2014-02-16 01:52

Recently I’ve been dealing with R and rapache at work. R is a language for statisticians. rapache is an apache module for executing R scripts in apache. Its like mod_perl or mod_php for R. I’ve been writing simple RESTful scripts that return graphics and JSON, and calling them from static html pages. I’ve been also using my MSDN Azure subscription to engage in R self study at home. In the spirit of my last post, I’ve posted the setup notes here to get you stated with a new Azure VM for running an rapache instance. Azure used a special cloud enabled version fo CentoS 6.3 called OpenLogic. However, it seems to work similarly to the vanilla CentoOS 6.4 instances I’ve used at work. So everything should apply there. If something doesn’t work leave a comment.

  • First, CentOS is very conservative, but Fedora makes EPEL to give you a more modern set of RPMs
    • rpm -Uvh http://epel.mirror.freedomvoice.com/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
  • Now lets install the packages we need. The kernel will be updated, so we will need to reboot.
    • yum update -y
    • yum install -y vim-x11 vim-enhanced xauth R terminator xterm rxvt R httpd git httpd-devel gcc cairo cairo-devel libXt-devel
    • yum groupinstall -y fonts
    • ldconfig
    • shutdown -r now
  • Now as a regular user lets compile rapache.
    • mkdir ~/src
    • cd ~/src
    • git checkout https://github.com/jeffreyhorner/rapache.git
    • cd rapache
    • ./configure && make && sudo make install
  • Now lets configure rapache. Create a file called /etc/httpd/conf.d/rapache.conf with the following:
# rapache configuration by Justin Dearing <zippy1981@gmail.com> LoadModule R_module modules/mod_R.so <Location /RApacheInfo> SetHandler r-info </Location> AddHandler r-script .R RHandler sys.source
  • Now restart apache.  Make sure it’t working by running  elinks http://localhost/RApacheInfo.

Azure doesn’t configure swap space by default. You’re going to absolutely need some swap space if you’re using an extra small instance. A good howto for that is here.

Categories: Planet


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